Launcher's Bytes System

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KAMIKADzE
KAMIKADzE
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Launcher's Bytes System

Postby KAMIKADzE » Mon 2020.05.18, 01:18

  • Byte (B) = 8 Bits (b)
    Exact origin of term is debated, 1956.
  • Kilobyte (KB) = 1024 Bytes
    SI, 1795.
    Also known as:
    • Kibibyte (KiB)
      ISO/IEC 80000, 2008.
  • Megabyte (MB) = 1024 Kilobytes
    SI, 1873.
    Also known as:
    • Mebibyte (MiB)
      ISO/IEC 80000, 2008.
  • Gigabyte (GB) = 1024 Megabytes
    SI, 1960.
    Also known as:
    • Gibibyte (GiB)
      ISO/IEC 80000, 2008.
  • Terabyte (TB) = 1024 Gigabytes
    SI, 1960.
    Also known as:
    • Tebibyte (TiB)
      ISO/IEC 80000, 2008.
  • Petabyte (PB) = 1024 Terabytes
    SI, 1975.
    Also known as:
    • Pebibyte (PiB)
      ISO/IEC 80000, 2008.
  • Exabyte (EB) = 1024 Petabytes
    SI, 1975.
    Also known as:
    • Exbibyte (EiB)
      ISO/IEC 80000, 2008.
  • Zettabyte (ZB) = 1024 Exabytes
    SI, 1991.
    Also known as:
    • Zebibyte (ZiB)
      ISO/IEC 80000, 2008.
  • Yottabyte (YB) = 1024 Zettabytes
    SI, 1991.
    Also known as:
    • Yobibyte (YiB)
      ISO/IEC 80000, 2008.
  • Xennabyte (XB) = 1024 Yottabytes
    There is no SI standard for this number. This is one of the proposed continuations set by previous SI standards above, combination of next English alphabet letter X and Greek prefix ennea (9). Also known as:
    • Xenabyte (XB)
      Different spelling (Xena warrior =D ).
    • Xenobyte (XB)
      Different spelling.
    • Xonobyte (XB)
      Different spelling.
    • Brontobyte (BB)
      It was used by some people to denote anything above Yottabyte, its origin is debated.
    • Hellabyte (HB)
      Proposed by UC Davis student Austin Sendek in 2010. He had run a petition that gathered over 60k supporters. I don't think this will be ever adopted as SI standard, and I'm personally against "hella" prefix, but still mentioning it here as some people use it.
    • Ronnabyte (RB)
      Proposed by Dr. Richard J. C. Brown in 2019.
  • Wekabyte (WB) = 1024 Xennabytes
    There is no SI standard for this number. This is one of the proposed continuations set by previous SI standards above, combination of next English alphabet letter W and Greek prefix deka (δέκα, 10). Also known as:
    • Wecabyte (WB)
      Different spelling.
    • Geopbyte (GeB)
      Used by the same people that use Brontobyte, and just like it its origin is debated.
    • Queccabyte (QB)
      Proposed by Dr. Richard J. C. Brown in 2019.
      This is going to make confusions with quantum units (qbit, qbyte), and it's not like it was proposed long time ago...
  • Vendekabyte (VB) = 1024 Wekabytes
    There is no SI standard for this number. This is one of the proposed continuations set by previous SI standards above, combination of next English alphabet letter V and Greek prefix hendeka (ἕνδεκα, 11). Also known as:
    • Vundabyte (VB)
      Different spelling.
    • Vendecabyte (VB)
      Different spelling.
I've probably more or less explained why and which non-standard names I've chosen, now onto the ISO/IEC 80000...a little bit of history lesson here:
Can be confusing...
SI prefix standard was accepted long before the appearance of bits and bytes, for decimal (base 10) system, while bits and bytes are a part of binary (base 2) system, e.g.: 1 Kilogram = 1000 Grams (103), while 1 Kilobyte = 1024 Bytes (210). This might be confusing for people that never heard about binary system, but for everyone involved this was/is normal and standard. A bit later sellers of hardware and ISPs figured it out and started to play trickery with both systems, for example a drive with 1MB space is advertised in decimals, so in reality you get ~0.95 actual Megabytes of space, but it's not like they produced physical 0.95 Megabytes, as that would be more costly than producing 1 Megabyte, in reality of course most of the stuff has some error corrections, imperfections and other extra space-taking things that make available size of product lower than even advertised ~0.95MB, but that's an unrelated story and just shows that marketing confusions are not caused just by decimal/binary systems, and ISPs have their own shenanigans, like using bits with upper-case letter (e.g.: 100MB instead of 100Mb), but once again that's not really a decimal/binary systems problem.
Anyway, IEC and some organizations/companies thought that all of that^ causes a lot of confusion and in order to avoid it they published new standard for Binary system (IEC 60027-2 Amendment 2) in 1999. It was based on proposition of IUPAC (Union of Chemists). Later on there were a couple of revisions/additions, and in the end it all was sorted out to what we have now (ISO/IEC 80000). Basically it says that 1 Kilobyte now = 1000 Bytes, while new 1 Kibibyte = 1024 Bytes, and so on (first 2 letters of SI + bi, which stands for binary, with shortened version SI + i). A bit later it was adopted by other organizations, governments, etc.
In the end this standard did not achieve what was envisioned by its creators, manufacturers simply continue to use decimals in their advertisement, as law of governments that accepted this standard will only punish those who advertise 1 Kilobyte as 1024 Bytes, since they're supposed to advertise it as 1 Kibibyte instead, so they're supposed to advertise lower capacity +1 extra character (printing cost), why would they? There are some that do, but most of the time that all (hardware/software) is tied by some requirements/restrictions, and do it just to avoid any possible legal disputes.

Basically my stand on it is this -> if you need to denote bytes in both decimal and binary system then use 1KB = 1024 Bytes, 1kB = 1000 Bytes, there simply was no need for this extra "i" to begin with, even their current standard has separation of B = Byte, b = bit, they simply could've standardized upper and lower case for the first letter, it they felt like it was needed for legal disputes.
tl/dr - I just like the old style and don't feel like the "new standard" is in any way better/superior.



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